Our Stories

 

Our Federation has long received requests for interviews with Child Survivors (including Hidden Children and Kind ertransport Children). Holocaust education, the creation of Speakers’ Bureaus, and the telling of our stories, are part of our reason for being as an organization.  We are able to have students and other interested parties contact and interview Child Survivors directly. The segments of stories you are reading on this page are only part of the larger stories but they give you an idea of who this Child Survivor is. At this stage, for reasons of privacy, the identity of the survivor is anonymous, only known by the first name of the survivor.

If you wish to contact the survivor in person, please email us with some information about yourself, who you are, where you come from, the purpose of the interview, how it will be used, etc.


 

  • Holocaust Memory, Preservation, Transmission When “the last witnesses” are gone, the last survivors and child survivors are gone….  who will bear witness in the museums, who will speak to the visitors and to the students, who will go into the schools, who will do the personal interviews for school projects… who will remind the world what occurred so long ...
  • New website and exhibit on Lost Childhood Jewish Child Survivors, Lost Childhood A new website from the Claims Conference, German Office. www.JewishChildSurvivors.org <http://www.JewishChildSurvivors.org> You can contact them to share your story. There is an exhibition to be shown in Frankfurt at the ZWST conference and in London at the conference of the Kindertransport children. Claims Conference, Office for Germany Sophienstraße 26  –  D -60487 Frankfurt am Main Tel.: ...
  • Book: Our Memories 2012 We are pleased to be able to share R. Gabriele Silten’s book, Our Memories 2012.  Our Memories is a book of poems, memoirs, and other documents submitted by child survivors and their families for the 2012 Cleveland Conference.  Gabriele has announced that this will be the last memory book. You can access Our Memories 2012 in ...
  • Steve T. MORE FROM A WANDERER I was born in Vienna, Austria on January 8, 1932. I was thus six years old at the time of the Anschluss (annexation of Austria by Germany). We left Vienna on an overnight train to Venice from S?dbahnhof (South Station) at 10 P.M. on September 8, 1938. We continued on to Milan. Once ...
  • Marcelle B. My parents were originally from a small town near the larger city of Lodz, in Poland. They came to live in Paris right after their marriage in 1930, and I was born there in August of 1931. Ours was a large family. My mother and father were cousins and each had six brothers and ...
  • Ilana D. My parents were born in Germany and fled after Hitler’s rise. Many of the members of their extended family managed to reach safe havens between 1933 and 1939 when the war actually started. This was the pattern of a great part of German Jewry. Thus I have cousins in South Africa, in Australia, in England, ...
  • Helen B. I am a child survivor of the Holocaust. Even though I am no longer a child at this time, I was a child when I lived through the Holocaust. Before the war, I lived in Brussels, Belgium with my family. I enjoyed a culturally rich orthodox Jewish family life. We were poor but never hungry and ...
  • Floris K. In July 1942, I was eight years old and living in occupied Belgium. The Germans had just begun to round up Jews and deport them so it became imperative for my family to go into hiding. Suddenly I found myself in a strange place away from home, away from Mum and Dad. I say “suddenly” because ...
  • Miryam L. A TALE OF TEREZIN (also known as Theresienstadt) Interview with My Mother, Miryam L., Child Survivor of Concentration Camp As Told To Esther V. L., 1999 SOME BACKGROUND NOTES: The place of my mother’s Birth, CHUST, is a small town in the province of galicia, in the foothills of the Carpathian mountains. The Romanian border was about 20 kilometers ...
  • Rudolph J. S.S. St. Louis experience I was born on May 11, 1933. After the promulgation of the Nurnberg laws in 1935, my parents decided there was no future for them or their in children in Nazi Germany and applied for a U.S. immigration quota number. It would be four years before this number would come up. In ...
  • Goldie S. Goldie survived the Auschwitz camp. Some questions and answers: #1 How long did you stay in Auschwitz? Five and 1/2 months. Went in with my mother and 2 sisters, was 13 1/2 years old when war ended. #2 What was your daily schelude? Did it vary from day to day? Because I was so young and my mother was weak ...
  • Richard V. I was born in Warsaw Poland and I lived there until 1939. In that year, after Germans occupied Poland, my parents and I managed to get across the border to the eastern part of Poland that was occupied by Russia. Due to various government restrictions we managed to finish up in a little village called ...
  • Gerda S. I was born in Przemysl, Poland, but after the Russians occupied Eastern Poland, we moved in to Lwow, to avoid being sent to camps in Russia. My father was a business man and was considered “an enemy of the state”. The Germans occupied our area in June of 1941 and we were forced into a ghetto ...
  • Malka B. My parents were originally from a small town near the larger city of Lodz, in Poland. They came to live in Paris right after their marriage in 1930, and I was born there in August of 1931. Ours was a large family. My mother and father were cousins and each had six brothers and sisters. ...
  • Rene G. I was born in Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 25 March 1934. My parents had immigrated from Western Poland. In 1940, after the German invasion of the Benelux countries, we moved to Brussels, where I began my primary education, in Flemish. But as insecurity grew, we fled in August 1942 to the  Unoccupied Zone of ...
  • Henry O.   Henry O   I was born in Amsterdam in April, 1940, a month before the German invasion of  the Netherlands (10th May 1940). My father was born in Krakow, now Poland.   He had moved to Vienna , Austria, at the age of 14.  He moved to Amsterdam in 1925 where he joined some of his brothers. My mother ...
  • Aaron E. Aaron E. Aaron lives in Chicago, Illinois, USA Good Afternoon, Honorable Mayor, (Mrs. Daley,) Distinguished guests, Fellow Survivors (by whose presence I am truly humbled), Students, Ladies and Gentleman The questions ladies and gentlemen is why do we speak about the holocaust?  Why do I speak? I speak because I can still be heard. Our voices are being extinguished ...

 

  One Response to “Our Stories”

  1. Sorry, but not available to help you, since we do not do this type of work.

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