Dec 292010
 

Presented at the Chicago/Skokie 2010 Conference.

Listen now: 

Audio MP3

You can download the file here: Cantor Mizrahi Concert

Dec 292010
 

Presented at the Chicago/Skokie 2010 Conference.

Listen now:

Audio MP3

You can download the file here: Peter Hayes Lecture: Teaching The Holocaust

Dec 282010
 

 22th Annual International Conference of Child Survivors and Families, 2G & 3G

Skokie, Chicago, Illinois, USA 
November 4-7, 2010

Speech by Professor Peter Hayes, “Teaching the Holocaust in 21st Century”.

Listen now:

Audio MP3

You can download the file here: Peter Hayes Lecture: Teaching The Holocaust

Speech and singing by Cantor Alberto Mizrahi, “A Living Traditon: Music of the Jews Throughout the World”

Listen now: 

Audio MP3

You can download the file here: Cantor Mizrahi Concert

Photos from the Conference


 

Dec 272010
 
JRI-Poland

For information on Jewish genealogical and records research in Poland, how to access documents, find family members, etc.. please see Jewish Records Indexing – Poland.

Holocaust survivors may be unaware that a remarkable number of Jewish records of Poland have survived the upheavals of history and the ravages of war. Jewish Records Indexing – Poland (JRI-Poland) has created indices to more than 4 million Jewish birth, marriage and death records from current and former territories of Poland that are housed in Poland today.

Indices to vital records more than 100-years old are available on the JRI-Poland online database: jri-poland.org/index.htm. Finding aids to another 600,000 records, less than 100-years old, are also available but are not online in order to comply with privacy issues of Polish law. They can be searched by special arrangements with JRI-Poland and are treated sensitively on a case-bycase humanitarian basis

To read more, click here: Jewish Records Indexing–Poland

Sep 182010
 
Rabbi Schneur Zalman Schneerson

This is the story of an orthodox Jewish rescuer in the south of France who managed to save more than one hundred children during the worst time of persecution – after the German occupation of Vichy France. This rabbi from the Chabad movement was not about to give up his religious principles, his adherence to the letter of the Halakha, his missionary drive of turning his charges into religiously observant and halakha-literate Jews, or his in-your-face Jewishness. He didn’t give up his Hassidic garb, his hat, his beard (red), his side locks, and was not shy of speaking French with a strong Russian accent to those in authority. But he did, in order to finance the rescue of the children from Hell, go into debt the collateral of which was his Paris apartment and other possessions, after the war. Employing these unorthodox means, barely acceptable by related organizations, the rabbi and his family themselves survived the war, immigrating to New York where his children and grandchildren now live.

Click here to download the full paper in PDF format.